Looking to make an impact in your community? These people have some ideas.

We’re always talking about giving back to our community. It’s important. But sometimes it’s hard to figure out where to start. Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash Volunteering and helping others isn’t just good for the people around you, it’s good for you, too. However, deciding what you want to do to help make an impact is often the trickiest part. Perhaps you’re wondering whether or not the skills you already have can translate into actions that will elevate the lives of those in your neighborhood? The answer is: Yes. There are endless ways to be an arbiter of change no matter where you live. Below you’ll find some great ideas and places to start. Build relationships with young people to …

She met women living on the street. She gave them a home and they built their future.

Becca Stevens is no stranger to poverty. All images by Stand Together and Upworthy. When she was five-years-old, her father was killed by a drunk driver. Impoverished both emotionally and economically, Stevens’ family had to work hard to make ends meet. Poverty became a defining aspect of her childhood. That was a big part of what drove Stevens to help others, especially the women she saw on the streets. So, as she grew into an adult, she started helping women who had been victims of violence, trafficking and prostitution by feeding them and bringing them to shelter. “I just felt sick for them,” Stevens says of the women she worked with on the street. But there was much more behind …

This is what happens when people meet cleaning challenges head on.

Remember the last time your house felt clean? It felt good, right? Everything back in the right place and your floors smelling like they’ve just been aired out in a garden can give you a deeper sense of relaxation and wellbeing than you might realize. For instance, did you know that a clean space can make you more productive? If you’re a parent — a clean home can help your kid do better in school. But that’s still only the tip of the iceberg: Researchers have also found that people who work in neater spaces are healthier, that those who have a clean home sleep better and eat healthier.  All that leads to you being an all around friendlier person, …

Being arrested is terrifying. This nonprofit can help you make your one call count.

When Jelani Anglin was a teenager, he was arrested for a minor infraction. Photo courtesy of Robin Hood. When he was taken to central booking, Anglin recalls how terrifying it was and how helpless he felt. He realized the experience was something that thousands of other people go through on an annual basis. “In the precinct, you’re nervous, you’re seeing folks coming in and out in handcuffs, you’re being fingerprinted, all your items are being taken away and there’s not much conversation with the police officers,” says Anglin. Even though it was only a minor infraction, and he was let go at the arraignment, being arrested was something Anglin never forgot. But rather than turn against “the system,” the helplessness …

Is cleaning up really good for your mind and body? We asked an expert.

Was your New Year’s Resolution to clean up and finally get your home organized? If it was, you’re not alone. Since the start of the year, cities all over the country are reporting more clothing donations than usual. And, of course, it seems like everyone is obsessed with the show “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo” and showing off their new home organization projects on social media. Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash So whether you were inspired by a TV show, the millionth fight with your partner over dirty dishes, or simply a walk past the Container Store, it’s always a good time to clean up and organize your space. “There is a pleasure in imagining that this thing — …

For people in addiction recovery, this unique program offers hope and a healthy community.

A decade ago, Todd and Kaley Jones couldn’t imagine a life without drugs and alcohol. When Kaley left a 9-month inpatient drug treatment program at age 19, she was terrified. She went digging through her makeup bags at home, hoping maybe she had stashed away some drugs so she could numb her fear. No luck. Later, she walked into a 12-step meeting and saw a man wearing a t-shirt that said, “SOBER.” Kaley was mortified. Why wasn’t he embarrassed? Wasn’t it a shameful thing to have had a drug or alcohol problem? But the man, Todd, wasn’t ashamed. “He was happy and he was laughing,” says Kaley, “and he told me about Phoenix.” Kaley and Todd Jones. All photos courtesy …