Amazon Credit Builder: What Is It and How Does it Work?

In a continued partnership with Synchrony Bank, Amazon has placed another card on offer: Amazon Credit Builder. It’s also been called out by some critics for targeting and potentially exploiting vulnerable consumers. Should you make room for it in your wallet? Here’s everything you need to know to about the service. What is Amazon Credit Builder? An Amazon Credit Builder secured credit card offers many of the same benefits as a regular Amazon Prime store card, such as 5% back on Amazon purchases. There are more restrictions with the new card, however, as Amazon Credit Builder can only be used to make purchases on the Amazon website and businesses with Amazon Pay functionality. For first-time credit customers and those who …

Break Up Big Tech? Some Say Not So Fast

For years, the US government stood by as big tech companies like Facebook and Google growth hacked and gobbled up competitors on their way to dominance, with barely a mention of “anticompetitive” concerns. But that lax attitude is changing. Word continued to leak this week about possible antitrust investigations by the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission, who reportedly divvied up companies like a couple might divide household chores. (The DOJ calls dibs on Google and Apple, while the FTC gets Facebook and Amazon.) House Democrats, meanwhile, are launching an antitrust probe of their own over competition in the tech industry more broadly. It’s too soon to tell whether any of this activity will lead to meaningful regulation, or …

The New Antitrust Scrutiny Should Worry Silicon Valley

Many Americans think Big Tech and Silicon Valley have too much power and need to be reigned in. Six weeks ago, it was hard to believe Washington had the political will to do much about that. Facebook had just said it would take a charge of up to $5 billion for an expected Federal Trade Commission fine related to its role in the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The reaction: Facebook’s stock jumped 6 percent to its highest price in nine months. The potential fine seemed manageable; Facebook has reported more than $5 billion in profit in some quarters. Investors concluded that regulators would, at most, give the company a hard slap on the wrist. Americans are used to Washington punting on …

Venture investors and startup execs say they dont need Elizabeth Warren to defend them from big tech

Responding to Elizabeth Warren’s call to regulate and break up some of the nation’s largest technology companies, the venture capitalists that invest in technology companies are advising the presidential hopeful to move slowly and not break anything. Warren’s plan called for regulators to be appointed to oversee the unwinding of several acquisitions that were critical to the development of the core technology that make Alphabet’s Google and the social media giant Facebook so profitable… and Zappos. Warren also wanted regulation in place that would block companies making over $25 billion that operate as social media or search platforms or marketplaces from owning companies that also sell services on those marketplaces. As a whole, venture capitalists viewing the policy were underwhelmed. …