India Goes Electric With Battery-Swapping Rickshaws

Pankaj Kumar drives his autorickshaw up to a charging station in a covered parking lot in Gurugram, a satellite city of New Delhi. He flips open a lid on the side of the box that was the driver’s seat. One at a time, he pulls out the two batteries powering the small vehicle, each about a foot high, five inches wide, and weighing 26 pounds. Kumar taps his key fob on the station, a large black box a bit shorter and wider than a vending machine. A locker pops open, revealing a fully charged battery. He pops it in, then repeats the action for the second battery. After just a few minutes of downtime, Kumar and his electric ride are …

Bobble-Heading Through the Mud in the Jeep Gladiator Pickup

From the top of the mound, I can’t see much. Some trees. A sky mottled with the clouds that over the past few days have soaked this grassy meadow in the Sierra foothills. And a pair of hands, ostensibly attached to a human being with their arms held high, beckoning me forward. Obeying them seems like a terrible idea. About as bad as driving up to the top of this slope in the first place. But orders are orders. I engage my core, clench my cheeks, and push my right foot onto the accelerator pedal. The 3.6-liter V6 engine responds, and the four 32-inch wheels, clad in mud-loving tires, roll forward. And so the Jeep Gladiator pickup truck rumbles down …

Safety-Obsessed Volvo Goes After Distracted, Speedy Drivers

Volvo has had it up to här with drivers. The Swedish carmaker has spent decades building a reputation based on safety (and low-key luxury), but humanity’s taste for speeding, distraction, and impaired driving remains a threat no airbag, semi-autonomous system or moose-detection system can neutralize. So this week, Volvo announced a raft of potentially controversial initiatives that will help deliver on its Vision 2020 goal—no more deaths or serious injuries in its new cars—by making its customers behave. After announcing a few weeks ago that it will limit the top speed of all its new cars to 112 mph, Volvo will roll out efforts to eliminate impaired driving, keep young drivers in check, and help its competitors benefit from its …

SEC: Elon Musk Fully Ignored a Key Term of Settlement

In defiance of an October settlement with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, Elon Musk did not have his tweets pre-approved by an official Tesla babysitter, the SEC says in newly filed court documents. In a filing submitted Monday evening, lawyers for the federal agency wrote it was “stunning to learn” that “Musk had not sought pre-approval for a single one of the numerous tweets about Tesla he published in the months since the Court-ordered pre-approval policy went into effect.”a (The SEC lawyers also complained in the filing that “it took more than two weeks for Musk and Tesla to concede as much.”) The dispute dates back to August 2018, when Musk tweeted that he had “funding secured” for a …

Elon Musk Says Tweeting Is Free Speech in His SEC Battle

Elon Musk will not go quietly. On Monday night, lawyers representing the Tesla CEO submitted a filing to a federal judge in New York arguing that she should deny the Securities and Exchange Commission’s request to hold Musk in contempt of court for—what else?—a tweet. Musk’s legal team argued that the SEC overreached in its request and claimed the agency is trying to violate his First Amendment right to free speech. If the judge, Alison Nathan of the Southern District Court of New York, does hold Musk in contempt of court, she would decide the penalty. “If the SEC prevails, there is a good likelihood that the District Court will fine Mr. Musk and that it will put him on …

Stacking Teslas Model Y Against Its Electric SUV Competition

For the Tesla fans who attended last night's Model Y unveiling event in Hawthorne, California, the effects of the open bar and Elon Musk's pizzazz should be just about wearing off. Which means it's time to get serious here, people, and size up the competition. The baby SUV Model Y will come in a few versions, priced from $39,000 to $60,000, offering ranges between 230 and 300 miles. Those are impressive specs, but while a new Tesla still feels like a major event, a whole host of family-toting electric SUVs are already on sale or about to come online. Glitzy debuts for the Jaguar I-Pace, Mercedes-Benz EQC, and Audi E-tron have come and gone. You can place an order for …